T. B. Mitchell: The Man Behind The Bees of the Eastern United States

from American Entomologist
September 2016

by Elsa Youngsteadt, Heather Moylett, Margarita López-Uribe, and April Hamblin

In the mothball-scented NC State University Insect Museum, thousands of bees bear the name T. B. Mitchell. The tiny, terse specimen labels, now caramel-colored and flaking, convey a skeleton history of a long and active career. “Highlands, NC, 1920, T. B. Mitchell” reads one . . . → Read More: T. B. Mitchell: The Man Behind The Bees of the Eastern United States

Cicada Killer Wasps Are on the Wing

from the Frank Lab Website
July 20, 2015

A male cicada killer perches atop a retaining wall, keeping watch over his territory. (Photo: E. Youngsteadt)

North Carolina’s steamy July days bring out some of our most spectacular solitary wasps. These sleek and streamlined hunters are quite docile toward humans, but are to be feared by other insects and . . . → Read More: Cicada Killer Wasps Are on the Wing

New paper: Ants make cities cleaner

from the Frank Lab Website
December 2, 2014

This is an essay I wrote about our research on ecology of urban insects; the results were just published in Global Change Biology.

The first time we came back to an empty cage in Highbridge Park, I thought there was a problem.

This was a cage cobbled together out of a fry . . . → Read More: New paper: Ants make cities cleaner

The Other Honey

from American Scientist
March-April 2012

In rural Ghana, stingless bees are well known as useful animals. Farmers raid natural hives to collect honey, which they use to treat ailments from eye infections to asthma. Many say the bees improve crop yields, and people refer to different species by their indigenous monikers. (The tifuie, for instance, is named after . . . → Read More: The Other Honey

In the News: Teaching, Not Technology

from American Scientist
March-April 2012

Population growth and devastating droughts have left thousands of Ethiopian pastoralists in poverty and hunger. But community groups that help people learn literacy, business skills and microfinance–rather than new technologies–made participants more resilient and hopeful even after a severe drought. Also in this issue’s news roundup: how humming birds flap, and a gas . . . → Read More: In the News: Teaching, Not Technology

Top 10 ScienceNOWs of 2011

ScienceNOW picked its top 10 stories of 2011, among them an article I wrote about pitcher plants that collect bat guano. Read about all 10 stories online or in Science magazine . . . → Read More: Top 10 ScienceNOWs of 2011